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20121101
20121130
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 51 (some duplicates have been removed)
and wrapped themselves in the flag of patriotism and corruption against the u.s. and on the taiwan issue and against japan, so the ngre has taken place against a backdrop of rising military influence. >> rose:. >> and if i could ask richard on that to me it was a sign of some kind of order in the chinese process, rather than disorder to have this clean handover, the chairman of the military commission of not having jintao hang around for a year or two, it is a modest step of transparency and institutionalization? >> i think you can definitely argue that this basically reflects well on the system, they don't have the former leading hanging on by his fingernails in another important post, that is true. but -- and that is why some people compliment jintao for respecting the process but in ordinary power politics term, it certainly shows that jintao was a much weaker leader than we thought. >> we have never seen foreign policy statements from li keqiang be, scituate. >> we don't know how assertive the military should be. >> rose: reform. >> we don't know, that's what really comes -- and you
in the u.s. all over the world. this is a big global phenomenon. and it's now impossible to keep track of how every company and how people are using the internet. there's so much dynamism. that's what makes me optimistic that it's still at the very beginning. >> rose: and british actress keira knightley inhabits her latest tragic her win on anna karenina. >> doing pride & prejudice was frightening because that is the character people love some of and women want to be that anna is not that kind of a creature. she's a sort of very difficult jewel like creare but she' not somebody that people want to be. so from that kind of perspective it wasn't as terrifying as making on something like elizabeth bennett. but it was definitely challenging. she is a very odd one. >> rose: bezos and knightley when we continue. funding for charlry rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. dns-- jeff bezos is here, thc.e.o. of amazon.com. he founded the company in 1994 out of his garage as an on-line bookseller. to
on september 11th that killed u.s. ambassador chris stevens and three other americans has led to a raft of sharp questions, accusations and recriminations. >> there were many days that passed before we knew whether we knew if this was a spontaneous demonstration or actually whether it was a terrorist attack. how could we not have known? >> i immediately made sure, number one, we did everything we could to secure those americans who were still in harm's way and most importantly, that we would go after those who killed americans and we would bring them to justice and that's exactly what we are going to do. >> but whether the president wins reelection, or governor romney takes the office, a dizzying array of broader challenges awaits overseas. romney says he'd restore a more assertive american role in the world. and the responsibility of the president to use america's greatest power to shape history not to lead from behind. >> the president says he's demonstrated strength and judgment. >> i said we'd go after al qaeda and bin laden, and we have. >> but the heated rhetoric doesn't offer muc
at their deposits and as guaranteed by the u.s. government. that's not totally correct but that's what they -- and when you have the ability to take in money from people who feel that they have the u.s. government behind it, they're going to give you money whether you're credit worthy or not and therefore you need some real regulation to make sure that people don't go wild with that franchise and banks with those funds and with that trust can some do some pretty extreme things. particularly when they've got -- the upside belongs to management. i don't worry about moral hazard with stockholders. they get killed in all these banks but management made lots of money and they didn't go away broke. >> rose: how do you assess -- i mean, this is part of that, i think-- what happened in 2008 and the subprime? >> well, it wasn't just subprime but it -- we left -- >> rose: that was part of it. >> we had a housing bubble like the world has never seen. well, housing was $22 trillion at the peak out of maybe total assets in the united states of $60 trillion or something. so it was an enormous asset.
within the u.s. government at the n.s.c. that the exexchanges between israel and hamas take israel into territory where it's just hard to know where they're going. i mean, they're now looking for a cease-fire, the u.s. is trying to use every diplomatic contact it has from mohamed morsi, the president of egypt, to the prime minister of turkey, prime minister erdogan to get the cease-fire. i think that the interesting question, the one that really -- the administration would love to focus on in the next few weeks is how do you get to a more stable situation in gaza where israel doesn't have to periodically take out heavy weapons and threaten the ground assault. we don't know yet whether that will happen. and people are talking about lots of possibilities. again, the central change that would be most beneficial would be if the new egyptian government decided to really get involved and in effect take ownership of the problems in gaza as the closest backer, supporter, of hamas. and if that happened, you'd have a quite different situation and one that potentially would be a lot better fo
is phenomena that is probably natural to competition for drug markets. i have here a chart that people in the u.s. might relate to that indicates homicide rates in the united states over the last 20 years. these figures correspond to cities like new york, atlanta, dallas, boston, los angeles, and they indicate how in the early 1990's, late 1980's, there was a very significant incrse inhe homicide rates. we have homicide rates all the way up to 60, 40, something like that. mexico's current homicide rate you can see on this tight. >> rose: 100,000. >> the rate is at 24 and it has raised significantly over the last few years. what we have confronted is a increase in homicide rates not only in mexico but in all the hemisphere over the last few years. in the decade between 2000 and 2010 the homicide rate, the averaghomide re in all of the americas increased by 60%. so what we're doing in mexico is a fight for security. we are improving the rule of law. we are confronting these cartels, we're trying to bring them down, bring them to justice. we are transforming institutions devoted to the rule of law.
secrets than anyone else in the u.s. government isn't in any way under a threat, under pressure from somebody else such that he would be vulnerable, you know, blackmail overstatements it. but what's he under, under duress in some way during the time he had this undisclosed relationship with a very willful person. i'm sure that that's the core of what they were looking at. and in a sense, david petraeus became free of thatresre a at cpulsion in the moment that that was revealed. and so i think people have raised a question once that was done if he's not now in the military and there's not a uniform code of military justice issue, was it necessary for him to resign as cia director. jim clacker the director of national intelligence thought the answer was yes and i think that was for two reasons. first younger people at the cia are told if you get involved in anything compromising, if you have an affair have you to disclose and he and i didn't and with this event double standard. and the second argument wasou may not be a gentleman now but you used to be but you ought to live by the rule
policy and a former u.s. envoy to the middle east. >> and abrams on the council for foreign relations a deputy national security advisor for global democracy strategy for president bush. his book tested by zion comes out later this year and i am pleased to have all of them here on this program this evening. i begin with dennis ross, tell me where you think we are at this moment, dennis. >> well, i do think the outline of the cease-fire are probably getting pretty close to being finalized, i don't think they are quite finalized yet, not because the outlines are unclear but because i think there is probably a desire to have the secretary of state make certain that the understandings are understood the same way by all of the parties, number one, number 2, that there are actually promises that are made on those understandings and commitments made to the united states as a way of making it more likely that promises made will be upheld. so i think there is a decent chance there is going to be a cease-fire, but in my experience in this part of the world and having been involved in a lot of n
. >> rose: lakhdar brahimi is here n august he replaced kofi annan as u.s. enjoy to syria, one of the most experienced diplomats in the world. he's deeply familiar with arab affairs. during the 198 0s he was undersecretary general of arab league. in the 1990s he served as algeria's foreign minister. after that he was special envoy to afghanistan and then to iraq post saddal hussein. when he became envoy to syria earlier this year he described his mission as quote nearly impossible. he is in new york this week to report to the united nations and security council on that mission and on the situation in syria. i'm pleased to have him back at this table, welcome. >> thank you very much. >> rose: you must be exhausted. >> i'm all right. >> rose: what will you say to the united nations. >> you know what, i'm going to tell them what i have been saying all along about the situation in syria is extremely bad. and dangerous. and getting worse. until now nobody has found a way of bringing it under control. we know that this is part of the arab spring. we know that change is coming. but as i think you
th anniversary of his first major victory of the u.s. nope 1987 imleasedo have nick faldo at this table for the first time. welcome. let me go to one thing in your life. most of us are always enamored when somebody changes their swing. tiger has done it a number of times. you famously did it and took time off to do it. with david letterman -- (laughs) david lindbergh. >> no comedy, it wasn't a funny time. >> rose: why did you feel the necessary toy do that? >> i threw myself in some situations. i was leading the open championship, there were nine holes to go, i collapsed on that fell apart sort sort of thing. >> rose: why do you fall apart? >> well, that time if you cannot hit certain shots under pressure, that's the real bottom line or put under pressure. so i had a great year in 1983, i was european number one. then i went another year through '84 and i played with ben crenshaw in the final group at the masters in '. i then won at hilton head, my first win in america. but to cut a long story short, by the end of the year a little voice said "you haven't quite got it." so
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 51 (some duplicates have been removed)